Overview of activities

IPEEC member countries work together through dedicated task groups to accelerate the adoption of energy efficiency policies and practices. These task groups design and implement technical work programmes on a range of energy efficiency topics, with the input and support of international organisations, non-governmental organisations (NGOs) and private sector partners. Each task group is funded directly by its participating members.
 
IPEEC currently oversees ten task groups, nine of which contribute directly to achieving the Group of 20 (G20) Energy Efficiency Leading Programme agreed by G20 leaders in 2016. IPEEC coordinates the implementation of the Leading Programme by supporting task groups, which drive collaboration and knowledge-sharing among G20 members and other participating countries on key areas for energy efficiency.

  G20 action

The G20 has a practical approach to strengthening voluntary international energy efficiency collaboration, which it pursues under the G20 Energy Efficiency Leading Programme, the group’s first long-term framework for energy efficiency. Under the Leading Programme, countries share knowledge, experiences and resources and engage in the energy efficiency activities that best reflect their domestic priorities. Nine IPEEC task groups contribute directly to the Leading Programme.

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  Appliances and equipment

Energy efficient appliances and equipment help to reduce energy demand and greenhouse gas emissions and also decrease energy costs for businesses and consumers. IPEEC’s work in this sector focuses on increasing the market availability of efficient appliances, electric equipment and lighting; improving how devices consume energy; increasing the information available to consumers; and phasing out energy-intensive equipment.

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  Buildings

The buildings sector accounts for more than 30% of global final energy consumption and therefore presents major energy efficiency potential (IPEEC, 2015). IPEEC’s work on buildings focuses on measures and technologies that reduce buildings’ final energy use and support lower electricity and fuel costs, lower greenhouse gas emissions, and more reliable energy demand.

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  Industry

Industry currently accounts for around 40% of final energy consumption (IEA, 2015, p. 405). IPEEC’s efforts to improve energy efficiency in the industrial sector are focused on energy management and the use of more efficient technologies in energy-intensive sectors.

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  Power

There is significant potential to increase the efficiency of global power generation. For example, a 1% improvement of the efficiency of global thermal power generation would reduce CO2 emissions by 340 Mt (IPEEC, 2015). IPEEC’s current work is focused on the dissemination of energy efficient technologies and best practices in thermal power generation.

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  Transport

While the transport sector currently accounts for around 28% of total global energy use, it is estimated that this may more than double by 2040 as a result of projected increases in the number of light-duty vehicles and associated fuel consumption (IEA, 2015, pp. 402-03). IPEEC’s work in this sector focuses on the huge untapped energy efficiency potential in light-duty and heavy-duty motor vehicles.

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  Cross-sectoral issues

Some energy efficiency challenges cross all sectors of the economy. Some of the biggest issues to address include financing (its availability, dissemination and tracking) and data (its availability, credibility and consistency). IPEEC oversees multiple task groups aimed at addressing these challenges across all sectors.

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